Now What?

Basic Firearm and Defensive Skills and Training Discussion Section.
Post Reply
User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:00 pm

Original post by maestro196 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

I have my Canik TP9SF. I have taken a basic pistol course where I learned safety, loading and unloading, sight picture and trigger control. I have been to a couple of indoor ranges and fired about 500 rounds trying to work on just getting used to the weapon. Are there any practice drills to help with marksmanship and or trigger control? Like in baseball you break the swing down to it's components and there are drills to do that. I'm sure there is something comparable with shooting (or I ope so) but I just don't know where it is. I was a total newbie to pistol shooting and I want to do this the right/safe way.

Thanks,
Rick
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:01 pm

Original post by wulf on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

Probably the best way to become a better shooter is to go and shoot. Familiarity and confidence with your gun will bring about better skills. YouTube has a lot of good videos concerning trigger control, which is the #1 factor in good marksmanship. There are dry fire drills you can do at home. Some people use snap caps, some use the iTarget laser system which looks pretty useful. However, as stated, get completely comfortable with the gun first and make as many range trips as you can. Work on the fundamentals and then progress.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:02 pm

Original post by kretch50 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum


Post by kretch50 on Oct 26, 2017 at 3:36pm
I encourage you to read these articles on this following sites and extract the info that applies to you:

www.luckygunner.com/lounge/why-you-arent-better/

www.luckygunner.com/lounge/start-shooti ... ure-drill/

www.luckygunner.com/lounge/how-to-practice-shooting/

https://pistol-training.com/drills

One other piece of advice. Find a shooting partner who is also interested in improving his skills. A little friendly competition is good
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:03 pm

Original post by maestro196 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

That’s exactly what I was looking for. I went to the range this evening after work and I’m starting to see some improvement but I want to keep improving. I my actually go to a steel shoot match this weekend and try my hand at something besides paper. Thanks for the help guys

Rick
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:03 pm

Original post by kretch50 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

Best wishes and feel free to continue asking us questions. My personal opinion is that group size is the best measure of your progress.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:07 pm

Original post by wulf on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

Steel matches are one of the best to observe and participate in because they rely on basic fundamentals.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:08 pm

Original post by LT USN (Ret.) on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

The best exercise IMHO is trigger reset drills. This is the best way to learn your firearm and learn trigger control. You can first start out at home and then try it live.

AT home:
1. Triple check that firearm is unloaded. (Safety, safety, safety)
2. Aim at the wall where there is nothing on the over side and no people are (Safety, safety, safety)
3. Squeeze the trigger and HOLD IT IN
4. Rack the slide back holding the trigger in
5. SLOWLY release the trigger until you feel and/or hear the click of the reset. STOP THERE.
6. You have just reset the trigger so if you squeeze the firearm will fire.
7. Aiming in a safe direction (Safety, safety, safety) squeeze trigger.
8. Repeat often

Practice this over and over again. If you think your getting it, start either placing an empty casing or a penny just behind the front site. Practice this over and over again.

You can also see how much your front sight moves when you squeeze the trigger. If the firearm is moving about during the dry-fire exercise work on not allowing it to move.

On the range try the same drill by this time loaded. Squeeze trigger and hold, slowly release trigger until it resets, deep breath, squeeze and hold. All the time while keeping the bore of your firearm aimed down range. (Safety, safety, safety)

Next thing to learn is front sight focus.
1 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:08 pm

Original post by maestro196 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

This concept of trigger reset is puzzling. I don’t understand what it is and why it matters. I pur pressure on the trigger until the weapon goes bang, let off and repeat until the magazine is empty. What am I missing?
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:09 pm

Original post by freeinaz on the old Canik Fanatik Forum
Oct 28, 2017 at 12:09am maestro196 said:
This concept of trigger reset is puzzling. I don’t understand what it is and why it matters. I pur pressure on the trigger until the weapon goes bang, let off and repeat until the magazine is empty. What am I missing?
It's a speed/accuracy factor. If you can hone your trigger skills to the point of barely letting off the trigger after the first shot, your follow up shots should be quicker and also more accurate. Less trigger finger travel = equals a more stable pistol (less operator induced variations, angles/height etc...). Think of it this way. When a gunsmith wants to test a gun for accuracy, they typically do it from a bench rest, often with the gun stabilized as much as possible. Why? To eliminate as much variations as possible. You're trying to do the same with your trigger stroke. ;)

Make sense?
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:10 pm

Original post by ssgndoc on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

If I was going to recommend a single practice drill to work on multiple pistol skills, the dot torture drill is a good place to start. Each dot is a different exercise. Slow fire, holster presentation, strong hand only, support hand only,double taps, target transitions. It is a pretty comprehensive package that lets you see where you are at. You start out at short distances and can progress to longer distances. No time limits, let’s you focus on technique.

When it comes to trigger reset, my personal opinion is that some folks stress it a bit much. It can indeed be helpful because of minimized trigger/pistol movement. But good trigger control and mastering your trigger stroke first may go further, early in your shooting practice. If you are pressing the trigger the same every time and applying straight rearward pressure through the entire pull that is the first part that will translate to improved accuracy. Combine that with a truely proper and firm grip, and you can be a little sloppier on your reset..

You also should set goals for yourself for each range session. What are you wanting to see improvement it? Precision with tight groups? Speed with “combat effective” hits? Improvements in draw speed, follow up shots, first shot hits at speed, distance accuracy, etc.?
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:11 pm

Original post by DWARREN123 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

Use the info given and dry firing. I like to use A-Zoom snap caps to protect the firing pin and breach face.
Lot of good info here.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:12 pm

Original post by Kyle - POL on the old Canik Fanatik Forum
Oct 27, 2017 at 11:58am wulf said:
Steel matches are one of the best to observe and participate in because they rely on basic fundamentals.


I second this. I take my newer students to steel matches not to make them fast, but to create opportunity for them to try target transitions, different target sizes and distances, and a focus on safe handling techniques. Of course it as also great to be involved in a shooting community that is supportive and assistive on the range.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:13 pm

Original post by maestro196 on the old Canik Fanatik Forum

So I have been shooting pretty regularly at the range but I am having some issues. I bought a MantisX, (what can I say I like toys) that monitors the movement of the firearm during the shooting process. It is tracking my movement as being down and sometimes to the left which does correlate to the patterns on the target. Some possible cause it lists are "Breaking Wrist Down" and "Pushing Forward". What does this mean and what do I do to correct it? Are these grip issues? Do I need to strengthen my wrists? Due to work I probably won't get back to the range until the weekend but I would like to be able to work on correcting this.
0 x

User avatar
Ghostwolf308
Staff Member
Posts: 398
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:26 pm
Founding Member #: 002

Re: Now What?

Post by Ghostwolf308 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 12:14 pm

Original post by T USN (Ret.) on the old Canik Fanatik Forum
Dec 4, 2017 at 9:38am maestro196 said:
what do I do to correct it?

I was just reading about the MantisX in the, hmm, reading room. Sounds like a good training aid. Try the practice tips I posted earlier in this post. The article talking about the MantisX outlined the same drills I listed.

Dry firing allows you to "see" the movement of the sights without the firearm going BOOM.

Practice often, frequently and, above all else, safely.
0 x

free_bawler
Member
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:27 pm

Re: Now What?

Post by free_bawler » Wed Apr 03, 2019 9:27 am

For a beginning shooter who is just getting familiar with shooting handguns in general, I agree with going to the range and getting very familiar with all aspects of the gun. However, for a shooter who wants to improve their skills, dry fire is the best method of improvement, not live fire. You should be improving your skills (trigger control, sight picture, grip, stance, etc) during dry fire and only validating those skills at the range. Of course, there are skills that you can only improve upon with live fire (follow ups, etc) but for most shooting drills, it's all about dry fire.

I have found that one of the most prevalent issues that most new shooters suffer from is control during trigger press. A fellow shooter turned me on to the MantisX training system awhile back so I took their advice and made the purchase. Since then it has improved my shooting tremendously. So much so, I got a match bump at my last Tier 4 IDPA match.
1 x

Post Reply